What does the CDD do?

The CDD was established to finance, construct, acquire, operate and maintain public infrastructure necessary for the development of Southwood. Currently, the CDD primarily operates and maintains stormwater infrastructure; parks (including Central Park and the Tot Lot), open/green spaces, other landscaping and conservation areas; and alleyways. The CDD constructed most of the roads within Southwood, but those roads have since been transferred to the City of Tallahassee for ownership and maintenance. The CDD does not own or operate the tennis courts, pool or clubhouse/community center; these are HOA facilities.

Who do I call about street light outages?

The City of Tallahassee is responsible for replacing street light bulbs. You can report them through the City’s app, http://www.talgov.com/Main/digitally.aspx. You can also let the District Office know so staff can let the City know about the outage. The CDD does not maintain the street lights.

Who is responsible for street trees?

The CDD maintains street trees on defined “backbone” roads. Other street trees are the responsibility of adjacent landowners under the recorded covenants and conditions for the Southwood community. If you have questions regarding responsibility for maintenance of street trees, please contact the District Office for the list of approved trees.

If I see something dangerous, who should I call?

If you have an emergency, please dial 911. For non-emergencies, call the Tallahassee Police Department at 850-891-4200.

If you encounter dangerous wildlife, including but not limited to alligators, water moccasins, wild boars or coyotes, you can find information about reporting to the Florida Wildlife Commission at http://myfwc.com/contact/nuisance-wildlife/.

Can I drive my golf cart on the trails and green spaces?

According to the City of Tallahassee’s ordinance on golf carts, these vehicles are not supposed to be driven on nature trails or sidewalks, as well as a few specific roads listed in the ordinance. The CDD also has a general policy that prohibits use of motorized vehicles on CDD property other than on designated roads, parking areas, or by authorized CDD or City personnel. Golf carts can also be very destructive to our green spaces if they are not driven responsibly.

Who takes care of the pool and the community center?

The HOA manages the Southwood pool and the Southwood community center.

Can I have a private birthday party at the Tot Lot?

The Tot Lot is a public space, as are all of the CDD’s amenities (including Central Park and the Central Park Lake). Residents are not allowed to bar or prevent others from enjoying the facilities. Also, the CDD’s policies generally prohibit organized, planned events intended to attract 10 or more people at any one time unless a special use application has been submitted and approved by the CDD.

What kind of security does Southwood have?

The CDD has two types of security patrolling Southwood. Barkley Security Services is a licensed private security firm with protocols on disrupting suspicious activities as well as coordination with city and county law enforcement if the need arises. They provide unarmed patrols on a regular but randomized schedule.

The CDD also works with the Tallahassee Police Department to provide additional patrols in our community during specific times, like during trick-or-treating on Halloween to ensure safety. The CDD pays for these expenses from special assessments collected as part of homeowners’ tax bills.

Can we do more to enforce the speed limit in Southwood?

The CDD does not have the power to enforce traffic laws. You can report speeding vehicles to the Tallahassee Police Department at 850-891-4200 or online at www.talgov.com.

Where can I find info on the proposed park project?

The CDD has a Q&A page for information about the proposed community park project.

How can we prevent overfishing of our ponds and lakes?

“Catch and Release” is not a state law; it’s a guideline. The District has no legal authority to enforce this recommended guideline. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission will enforce licensing and state bag limits, which include species, size and quantity.